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28 Nov
What You Need to Know About an Income Statement

What You Need to Know About an Income Statement

Let’s face it, many business owners who are busy with the daily routines of running the company, struggle with taking the time to fully understand accounting principles and terminology. Yet, there are important concepts to comprehend if we are going to run a profitable and successful small business. In this article, we share a layperson’s explanation of an income statement.

The financial statements of a business provide a representation of the company’s current performance to owners and investors. The most important financial statement for the majority of companies is likely to be the income statement, since it reveals the ability of a business to generate a profit. This financial report is not only used by management within a company, but also by outside creditors and investors to evaluate performance, profitability and assessment of risk for a creditor or investor.

Income statements do not just report the income your company makes, i.e. the cash coming in. Rather, an income statement reports the revenues earned by your company during a specific period of time (month, year, etc.). Also, it shows the expenses incurred by your company during the same time period. The income statement is valued because of its indication of profitability, timely reporting and classification of revenues and expenses. You can use this report to track revenues and expenses and determine the operating performance of your business over a period of time.

Understand the Parts of an Income Statement

Simply, an income sheet will add up all of the sales/revenues and subtract all of the expenses. Hopefully, the total will be a positive number, or profit. A negative remainder would be a loss. But what goes into the sales and revenues? What goes into the expenses?

Income is the money your company receives (or will receive) for selling your product or service for the given time period. It does not include assets.

Expenses are the costs incurred in order to sell the products and services. This can be separated into Costs of Goods Sold and Overhead Costs. Costs of Goods sold are variable expenses, such as commissions and shipping charges. Overhead costs are fixed and include items such as rent and salaries. These two types of expenses are often separate line items on an income sheet, allowing one to determine margins.

Income Statement

Components of an Income Statement

• Cost of Goods Sold
• Gross Profit
• Operating Expenses
• Operating Income
• Other Income/Expenses
• Profits

Accrual Basis

The most accurate income sheets are based on accrual basis. This means that income and expenses are recorded for months they actually occur, not just when money changes hand. For example, if you sell 50 widgets for $500 to Buyer 1 on October 15, but Buyer 1 doesn’t pay the invoice until November, the $500 revenue would show on your October income statement. Additionally, if your employee sold the widgets and earns a $50 commission, but doesn’t receive that pay until November 8, the expense (Cost of Goods) will still go in October’s statement, as well.

When accounting is done on an accrual basis, revenues earned are tied to the related expenses incurred in achieving those revenues. This is called the matching principle. This helps when determining profitability on the income sheet for the given time period. Getting this more accurate view helps small business owners make more specific decisions to improve profitability, by seeing the direct correlation between revenues and expenses.

Cash Basis

A cash basis income statement only contains revenues for which cash has been received from customers, and expenses for which cash purchases have been made. In other words, under the cash basis of accounting revenues are reported on the income statement in the period in which the payment is received from customers. Expenses are reported on the income statement when expenses are paid out.

Cash basis accounting is simpler than accrual because it recognizes only two kinds of transactions: cash inflows and outflows. The main difference between accrual and cash basis accounting lies in the timing of when revenue and expenses are recognized. The cash method is a more immediate recognition of revenue and expenses while the accrual method focuses on anticipated revenue and expenses.

Make Informed Financial Decisions for Your Business

Once you understand an income statement, you can get a true picture of your business’s overall health. Are your margins poor? Are your costs of goods sold too high in relation to the revenues they earn? Are your overhead costs also too high, or can you afford the nicer offices you’ve had your eye on? Can you afford more sales staff? Do you need to look for a supplier with lower costs? Looking at your company’s profits and losses accurately will help you make these decisions, and more.

American Receivable can help bridge gaps in your income statements. Our commitment to providing our clients with responsive customer service and the most competitive rates in the industry has made us the go-to source for factoring in Texas and throughout the nation. The success of our clients is the success of American Receivable.

With offices in Dallas and Austin, American Receivable is ranked No. 1 nationally among small-business factoring companies. Since 1979, we have provided small businesses with the financial resources and accounts receivable management strategies they need to grow, increase inventory, make payroll on time, and effectively compete in the marketplace. We can provide funding within as little as 24 hours in some cases. Call us for a FREE quote today at 1-800-297-6652, or complete the quick quote form below.

13 Nov
Thanksgiving Through the Years

Thanksgiving Through the Years

The first Thanksgiving in Plymouth Colony which is now Massachusetts was in 1621.  The last Thursday in November was declared a national day of thanksgiving by Abraham Lincoln  200 years later.  In 1941 Congress made Thanksgiving an official national holiday. A day of “thanks” and “giving”.

Thanksgiving has traditionally been a day of family and friends getting together for a meal and fellowship.  A day to stop and reflect on all of the blessings we share.  In 1876, football was introduced as a tradition.  Yale and Princeton played the first American Football game on Thanksgiving day.  People were off from work and were able to go see football. It was not until 1934 that the first football game was broadcast.  The Detroit Lions played the Chicago Bears at University of Detroit Stadium and a new tradition, which later became a television broadcast.

Thanksgiving has changed over the years.  While many of the original traditions remain, new ones were born.  Black Friday became a big tradition for many families.  Getting up at early hours to go Christmas shopping for the best deals.  The idea came from retailers showing losses seeing a surge in sales on discounted merchandise on  Black Friday, often bringing their revenues back in the black.  Retailers started opening early on Black Friday and advertising big sales.  In the last decade, lit has become a Thanksgiving evening tradition with stores opening on Thanksgiving evening and staying open 24 hours. People have made their own traditions as well.  Many take vacations and skip the big meal and the shopping, although most still incorporate a game of football in the plans.

Thanksgiving is celebrated in many ways.  However you celebrate, remember to give “thanks” and “give” to those in need.

American Receivable is thankful for our customers and our relationships in the financial industry.  We wish everyone a safe and happy holiday.

In the words of the late Erma Bombeck:

“It takes 18 hours to prepare a Thanksgiving meal,

 It takes 12 minutes to eat it.  Half-times are 12 minutes.

 This is not a coincidence.” 

07 Nov
Business Partnerships: A Necessary Risk

Business Partnerships: A Necessary Risk

Starting a business is an exciting venture.  Sole proprietorship allows you the freedom to Implement your own ideas, business procedures, and schedules as you wish.  The decisions you make will not impact anyone except you.

Working alone can be difficult when trying to jump-start a new business.  Most people need help in some areas, especially with the financial aspect. Some people may be better suited for a collaborative effort.  People have different strengths and weaknesses which is beneficial to the business. 

There is always a risk in a partnership.  You have heard the saying “nothing is forever”.  Many problems can arise when working with other people. Many people go into business with someone who initially seems to have the same mind-set and goals for the business. At some point during any partnership, egos, differences in opinion or direction may cause a rift in the partnership.  When the partnership dissolves, there are often claims of ownership and property that can cause disputes.  Partnership agreements can eliminate legal disputes that may arise from the split.  If one partner is going to keep the business, legal disputes can be expensive and result in the business being forced to close. Different skill sets, temperaments, and ideas can create diversity. However, the necessity for financial help, implementation of business procedures and creative ideas are worth the risk is you are protected.

Business partnerships are often necessary and have the potential to make the business a success.  However, a partnership agreement is unquestionably critical in making sure both parties are protected in the event the partnership dissolves.

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